Gardens Gazette 1st Edition 2019

Gardens Gazette 1st Edition 2019

Kew Gardens Gazette – Christmas edition 2018

Kew Gardens Gazette – Christmas edition 2018 Click here for more information about Kew Gardens Gazette – Christmas edition 2018

How music could revolutionise dementia care

How music could revolutionise dementia care Click here for more information about How music could revolutionise dementia care

Kew Gardens Newsletter – 2nd Edition

Kew Gardens Newsletter – 2nd Edition Click here for more information about Kew Gardens Newsletter – 2nd Edition

The Gardens Gazette

The Gardens Gazette First Quarter 2018 Click here for more information about The Gardens Gazette First Quarter 2018

How dementia changes the way you hear the world, By Michael Mackenzie, 16 November 2017

How dementia changes the way you hear the world, By Michael Mackenzie, 16 November 2017

Click here for more information about How dementia changes the way you hear the world, By Michael Mackenzie, 16 November 2017

The Gardens Gazette 3rd Quarter 2017

The Gardens Gazette 3rd Quarter 2017

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The Gardens Gazette 2nd Quarter 2017

The Gardens Gazette 2nd Quarter 2017

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Budget: Funding for aged care workforce measures – By Darragh O’Keeffe on 10 May, 2017

Budget: Funding for aged care workforce measures – By Darragh O’Keeffe on 10 May, 2017

Click here for more information about Budget: Funding for aged care workforce measures – By Darragh O’Keeffe on 10 May, 2017

Aged care Budget Review 2016–17 – Alex Grove and Anna Dunkley on 10 May, 2017

Aged care Budget Review 2016–17 – Alex Grove and Anna Dunkley on 10 May, 2017

Click here for more information about Aged care Budget Review 2016–17 – Alex Grove and Anna Dunkley on 10 May, 2017

‘No surprises’ aged care budget welcomed – LASA Victoria on 10 May, 2017

‘No surprises’ aged care budget welcomed – LASA Victoria on 10 May, 2017

Opportunity for medical students to join the Peer Visitor Program in Kew – AMA Australia

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The Gardens Gazette

The Gardens Gazette

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Asset test for aged pension should include family home, Australian Chamber of Commerce By Peter Ryan, ABC

Asset test for aged pension should include family home, Australian Chamber of Commerce By Peter Ryan, ABC

Click here for more information about Rads lag against rising value of property prices

Student Volunteer Interview with Laura

Click here for more information about Student Volunteer Interview with Laura

Rads lag against rising value of property prices

Rads lag against rising value of property prices – Inside Ageing, 18 January 2017

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The Gardens Gazette – CEO Message

Why does time fly as we get older? Well, once again we have reached the end of another year.

Click here for more information about The Gardens Gazette – CEO Message.

Music to the ears of dementia patients

Music to the ears of dementia patients suggests new learning is possible by Bridie Smith, THE AGE
It was a stroke that robbed Leonie Fitzgerald of her words.

Click here for more information about music to the ears of dementia patients.

New requirements for our future aged care workforce

Australia’s aged care workforce needs to be renewed if it is to meet the challenges of increased demand, consumer choice, a rapidly changing marketplace and the integration of new technologies, Leading Age Services Australia (LASA) told the Future Aged Care Workforce Senate Inquiry in Canberra today.
LASA CEO Sean Rooney told the Senate Inquiry that the current aged care workforce was ageing and it needed to expand and change composition rapidly to meet the growth in demand for services.

Compulsory reporting resources for residential care providers

To help protect aged care residents, the Aged Care Act 1997 has compulsory reporting provisions.
This means that approved providers and their services must report suspicions or allegations of assaults to local police and the Australian Department of Health (the department).

The Gardens Gazette

Spring is just around the corner! We are all looking forward to the longer days and a bit of sunshine to warm our bones and lift our spirit.

Click here for more information about The Gardens Gazette – Kew Gardens

Aged Care Roadmap

Aged Care Roadmap: a guide to the future of aged care?

Click here for more information about Aged Care Roadmap.

Healthy Diet, Exercise May Help Keep Alzheimer’s at Bay

Study finds people who are active and eat well have fewer brain effects linked to the disease

LASA Victoria

Reappointment of Aged Care Ministers offers continuity but greater cooperation with providers is needed

A Practical Guide to Food Safety

The Australian Aged Care Group has food safety programmes in place that meet all guidelines and government legislation. This ensures that food prepared and cooked for our residents is of high standard.

Click here for more information about A Practical Guide to Food Safety – Kew Gardens

My Aged Care improvements

My Aged Care improvements – LASA Victoria (Thursday 23 June, 2016)

Votes at risk over aged care funding cuts

Votes at risk over aged care funding cuts: providers – Australian Ageing Agenda
By Darragh O’Keeffe on June 17, 2016

Click here for more information about Votes at risk over aged care funding cuts: providers – Australian Ageing Agenda

Doctors Meeting Group sessions

Doctors Meeting Group sessions now off and running at Kew Gardens.

Click here for more information about Doctors Meeting Group – KG News

The Gardens Gazette

Finally, winter is upon us. After a pleasant and record-breaking warm autumn, the cold weather has well and truly arrived and with it the usual bugs and viruses.


Click here for more information about The Gardens Gazette – CEO Message

Leading Age Services

Leading Age Services Australia (LASA) spokesperson Beth Cameron is demanding Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull reverse $3.1 billion of funding cuts his government has stripped from aged care.


Aged-care change is ‘a Band-Aid over a broken system’, says Council on the Ageing

Aged-care change is ‘a Band-Aid over a broken system’, says Council on the Ageing
Funding model change saves $1.2bn but council is disappointed there are no greater incentives to reward good aged-care providers.

Click here for more information about Aged-care change is ‘a Band-Aid over a broken system’.

Aged-care funding nursing homes cut federal budget

Aged care funding for nursing homes cut by $1.2bn in federal budget
Treasurer announces cut due to higher than expected growth in expenditure, while Medicare benefits will remain frozen for a further two years

Click here for more information about Aged-care funding nursing homes cut federal budget.

Margaret Mary Davey Newspaper Tribute

The Age and The Herald Sun Click here for more information about Margaret’s family would like to thank Jane…

Quality Matters: Move it or lose it!

Quality Matters: Move it or lose it! – Marjorie Armstrong
Recently while on holiday day in Sicily, my husband and I were sitting on the balcony of our rental apartment, admiring the view of the sea and a small bay

Quality Pages

Kew Gardens Newsletter 1st Quarter

The Gardens Gazette
How time flies when you’re having fun!

Click here for more information about Kew Gardens Newsletter 1st Quarter 2016.

Student Volunteer Interview with Samantha Bayle

What has been the most enjoyable part of volunteering here at Kew Gardens? Please click here to Read more

How to have a conversation about aged care

How to have a conversation about aged care – Sydney Morning Herald (20 January 2016)

Three Generations of Care

The Australian Aged Care Group Pty Ltd (AACG) has been born from three generations of experience of the Matthies family who have been involved in aged care since the 1960s. Read more

Kew Gardens Newsletter December 2015

Merry Christmas from everyone here at Kew Gardens!

DPS News – Research Project to Assist Seniors with Dual Sensory Loss

Research project to assist seniors with dual sensory loss
Age related dual sensory loss or deafblindness is an isolating disability for our growing ageing population.

Click here for more information about Research Project to Assist Seniors with Dual Sensory Loss

DPS News – New PM Should Appoint Minister for Ageing

Australia’s new Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, should appoint a Minister for Ageing, says Adjunct Professor John G. Kelly, chief executive officer of Aged & Community Services Australia.

Click here for more information about New PM Should Appoint Minister for Ageing.

12 months on from Nation’s New Aged Care Fee System

Do your sums when looking at aged care options
MIXING emotions with financial factors is one of the biggest potential traps facing the families of the tens of thousands of Australians who are moving into aged care each year.

Click here for more information about 12 months on from Nation’s New Aged Care Fee System.

Aged Care Reform

Our aged care system touches the lives of millions of Australians.
More than one million people receive aged care services, with over half a million people receiving support at home.

Click here for more information about Aged Care Reform.

September is Dementia Awareness Month

DEMENTIA AWARENESS MONTH 2015 Find your way around: information and resources for Dementia Awareness Month

AFL Legend Mathew Richardson to visit Kew Gardens

TIME: 11am — 12pm DATE: Thursday, 1 October VENUE: Fountain Lounge, First Floor
After 282 Games and 800 Goals with the Richmond Football Club, Richo retired from the game in 2009.

Click here for more information about AFL Legend Matthew Richardson

Catering Update – Daily Buffet Breakfast Now Available

Kew Gardens is now presenting an à la carte Buffet Breakfast menu, which is available every day in the dining room.
The buffet offers a sumptuous selection of both hot and cold items.

Click here for more information about New Buffet Breakfast – KG News

Lifestyle Report Parliament house visit

Residents at Kew Gardens had a very exciting trip on 20th August 2015 travelling into Melbourne’s business district to historic Parliament House.
They arose especially early, eager to attend the question time session being held that day.

Click here for more information about Parliament House Visit – Lifestyle Report

Peak of Victoria’s Flu Season to come in September – THE AGE VICTORIA (27 August 2015)

Peak of Victoria’s flu season to come in September
If you’re suffering with the flu, or taking care of a child who has it, you’re not alone.

Click here for more information about flu season to come in September.

Kew Gardens Winter Newsletter

Lifestyle Report – Parliament house visit Residents at Kew Gardens had a very exciting trip on 20th August 2015 travelling into Melbourne’s business district to historic Parliament House.

Please click here to read more about LIFESTYLE REPORT – Parliament House Visit

The Gardens Gazette

CEO Message Dear residents, relatives and friends, You may have noticed some of the recent changes made to our catering service at Kew Gardens.

Click here for more information about Kew Gardens RR Newsletter Winter 2015 FINAL Low Res.

Laughter therapy

Laughter therapy could lead to reduced medication levels in aged care facilities – The Canberra Times (July 22, 2015)
Canberra aged care workers are training to harness the power of smiles and laughter for health benefits.

Click here for more information.

LIFESTYLE REPORT

Day at ‘The G’ on Saturday 4th July Richmond vs GWS Kew Gardens Residents had a special outing on Saturday, 4th July to watch Richmond versus GWS Giants at ‘The G’.

Please click here to read more about LIFESTYLE REPORT – The G

Kew Gardens Carvery

An exciting addition to the culinary offerings at Kew Garden is the new carvery station. The mouth-watering meats will be available on a weekly basis, serving prime cuts of meat sliced to order.

Please click here to read more about Kew Gardens Carvery

Quality Matters

How best to communicate with residents who suffer from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
Behaviours vary significantly from person-to-person.
Please click here to read more about Quality Matters article

Kew Gardens Al fresco Café — New Menu

Kew Gardens Aged Care is excited to introduce our updated Al fresco Café Menu. The refreshed menu, featuring new, delectable additions, is available from 25 May 2015.
Please click here to find out more about our new menu

Budget: Changes to accreditation, restorative care, healthy ageing grants

The Federal Budget contained several changes to aged care policies and programs, from the opening up of the accreditation process to private operators to changes to the healthy ageing grants.

Please click here to find out more about Budget: Changes to accreditation, restorative care, healthy ageing grants

Kew Gardens Student Volunteer Interview

What has been the most enjoyable part of volunteering? The most enjoyable part of volunteering, for me, was interacting with the residents. From my experience volunteering at Kew Gardens Aged Care.

Please click here to find out more about Kew Gardens Student Interview

Geelong College Visit

On Thursday 26 February, we had the pleasure of being the guests of prestigious secondary school, The Geelong College, for a tour of its campus, including a special lunch in the dining hall. Founded in 1861, The Geelong College is a Uniting Church coeducational day and boarding school with approximately 1,300 students aged from three to eighteen. Please click here to find out more about Kew Gardens – Geelong College Visit

Lifestyle News

Footy Fever Kicks Off at Kew Gardens!
Kew Gardens Aged Care has been very fortunate in our long-standing association with the Richmond Football Club.
Please click here to find out more about Richmond Footy Club

Quality Matters — Helpful Tips

Look after yourself as Winter approaches . . .
We are constantly striving for the continuous improvement of health and hygiene standards at the Australian Aged Care Group Pty Ltd (AACG).
Please click here to find out more about Quality Matters – Flu Reminder

Easter Celebration at Kew Gardens

The lead up to Easter is always a very special time at Kew Gardens with many egg-clectic craft activities organised for our residents by the Lifestyle Team!
Please click here to find out more about Easter Celebration – Kew Gardens

Lifestyle Update – Kew Gardens

‘Music’ is therapy for the soul…
The Kew Gardens Lifestyle team is dedicated to providing our cherished residents with a highly stimulating and robust Lifestyle programme.
We are, therefore, very pleased to introduce the latest addition to our entertainment line up — a session entitled, “Life and Music of Great Composers.”
Please click here to find out more about Lifestyle update – Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens Quality

We at Australian Aged Care Group Pty Ltd pride ourselves on not only providing quality of care, but also on offering a positive approach in assisting residents to maintain a quality of life.
There is a subtle difference between quality of life and quality of care even though they often intermingle making it hard to differentiate between the two.
Please click here to find out more about KG – Quality.

Flu Vaccination

As we approach the Winter months, Kew Gardens Aged Care will be planning the provision of pneumococcal and/or flu vaccines to our residents and staff. However, we have been recently advised by our Doctors at Kew Gardens that there is an unusual strain of influenza present in the USA. As a consequence, the vaccines to Australia have been slightly delayed until April. When they do arrive, we will commence the Vaccination programme for our Residents (and staff who wish to have it), as per usual.


For more information on influenza and remedies, please visit http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Flu_influenza

Government House

We had the pleasure of having a private viewing of government house last week which proved to be a most wonderful tour.

Residents felt honoured to be in the inner sanctum and were in awe of the magnificent ballroom and original fixtures and fittings.

We were given a history of government house and viewed the prominent governors and their wives down through the ages to our current governor His Excellency Sir Alex Chernov and his wife, Elizabeth.

We also viewed the famous billiard room where Robert Lindum played.

We finished our day continuing onto the Royce hotel where we dined on fine wines and delicious food.

A wonderful day had by all.

Clare O’Meara
Tour guide
Kew Gardens Aged Care

Sky High Restaurant — Mt Dandenong

I had the pleasure of taking 12 residents to a ‘Christmas in July’ luncheon at the Sky High Restaurant, Mt. Dandenong.

Although this was set in winter, we were blessed on leaving Kew Gardens with beautiful sunshine, although we all still donned our coats and scarves.

Our journey from Kew Gardens to the Dandenongs was relaxing with music filtering through the bus and the scenery with the sun coming through the bus windows was quite magical. All residents were in good spirits and very much looking forward to the day’s outing.

As we made our way up the hills, we had a few light showers but on arrival at the restaurant the sun shone in our favour.

We were seated in the Restaurant by the window with beautiful views although due to the cold, we could not see the city clearly. It was lovely that feeling of being amongst the clouds.

We enjoyed a traditional Christmas lunch, turkey, ham cranberry sauce followed by plum pudding and custard. We also shared our bon bons, wore our party hats and partook of beautiful wines offered to us. Many memorable photos were taken.

We were serenaded throughout the lunch by a pianist playing many old songs, Christmas songs and it was lovely background music to a perfect day.

On returning to Kew Gardens, with high spirits, full stomachs and big smiles, the residents delighted in the outing and were happy to retire to their rooms for some down time.

A most successful day.

Clare O’Meara

Tour guide

Kew Gardens Aged Care

A new era begins for aged care

A small number of aged care providers will not be able to charge an accommodation payment to new residents from 1 July because they are yet to publish their pricing information on the My Aged Care website.

Read the full article

Aged care, NDIS, tax among July 1 changes

Changes to aged and disability care dominate a long list of federal policy changes to kick on from July 1.

Read full article

Golden oldies pay $1m bonds for aged care at lavish centres

Older Australians are handing over million-dollar bonds to spend their final years at some of the nation’s most lavish aged care centres.

Read full article

Budget Fact Sheet – Aged Care

The Australian Government is redirecting 
$1.5 billion from the Aged Care Workforce Supplement into the general pool of aged care funding.

Download article

Legislative Government

Legislative Governance Forum on Food Regulation – FINAL COMMUNIQUE, 13 December 13.

Application Form and Application Guide

A message from the Aged Care Pricing Commissioner on issues raised during public consultation on the draft Application Form and Application Guide for accommodation prices that are above the maximum amount determined by the Minister.

  I would like to thank those who have responded to the invitation for comments on the draft Application Form and Application Guide for accommodation prices that are above the maximum amount determined by the Minister. A number of the changes that have been made to the Application Form and Application Guide are set out below. In addition, the submissions received highlighted a number of areas where further clarification would be beneficial, and these are also set out below. Where issues raised relate to matters that are within the purview of the Department of Social Services or the Minister, those issues will be communicated to the Department. In particular, I would like to clarify the following points:

Grandfathering of existing arrangements

Amendments to the Aged Care Act 1997 which commence on 1 July 2014 allow for the ‘grandfathering’ of agreements to pay accommodation payments entered into with residents before 1 July 2014.  In particular, from 1 July 2014, the Aged Care Act introduces the concept of ‘continuing residential care recipients’.  Generally speaking, continuing residential care recipients are individuals who entered residential care before 1 July 2014 without a break in residential care for more than 28 days in a row. However, this ‘grandfathering’ does not apply to agreements to pay accommodation payments that are entered into with residents on or after 1 July 2014. Where providers seek to enter into agreements on or after 1 July 2014 which involve charging residents more than $550,000 as a Refundable Accommodation Deposit (RAD), or its equivalent as a Daily Accommodation Payment (DAP), they must have approval from the Aged Care Pricing Commissioner. In the event that providers do not have this approval, they will not be able to charge more than $550,000.

I strongly encourage providers who seek to charge prices above this amount in new arrangements after 1 July 2014 to make an application shortly.

The arrangements for existing residents continue under their existing provisions, unless the resident re-enters care after leaving care for a period of 28 days or more, or if they move aged care homes and decide to enter under the new arrangements. This is not a decision at the discretion of the Pricing Commissioner, but is a legislative requirement of the Aged Care Act.

Approval of maximum price

Where providers seek and obtain approval to charge a price for a group of rooms that is above the threshold, this price is the maximum price that can be charged only. It does not limit the provider from charging prices below that maximum, at their discretion.  

Timeframes

A number of submissions drew attention to the statutory timeframes applying  to the consideration of applications. It is my intention that the actual time taken to consider applications will be a great deal shorter than the statutory limits. In particular, I acknowledge that in many instances notification will be required within a short timeframe. The application process allows an applicant to nominate a critical date by which notification is required. For example, a critical date may be necessary for an application that relates to a proposed facility which requires an approval to secure finance or to acquire land. In a previous exposure draft of the Fees and Payments Principles, applicants were not able to make a new application to the Pricing Commissioner (following either an approval or a refusal to approve) within a 12 month period of a previous decision. Given the difficulty that this may have presented to providers, I have asked, that this timeframe be reduced to 4 months.

Re-applying

While providers will be given approval to charge prices above the threshold for a four year period, this does not limit their ability to re-apply within that four year period. Provided that an application is made four months after the date of an original decision, a provider may re-apply at any time. If approval is given for a new price, providers do not have to wait for the expiry of the previous approval period to charge that price. Accordingly, should particular business factors emerge which influence pricing, including price indexation, applicants are able to reapply after a period of 4 months from the previous decision. The proposed four year approval period is not at the discretion of the Commissioner, but is a requirement under the draft Fees and Payments Principles 2014. While approvals will be given for a four year period at this time, and it is envisaged that this four year approval period will apply in the future, I will ensure a streamlined approach for subsequent approvals is provided. Where  an initial approval has been given, and  where  there  have  been no substantial material  changes to the condition  of rooms  to which prices  above the threshold are  proposed to apply then a simple certification process will be established.

Publishing of prices

Providers are reminded that the date on which approved prices should be published from is 19 May 2014.  This date has been revised from earlier requirements that prices be published by 1 April 2014,  in order  to provide additional  preparation time for providers while still allowing some time for adjustment to the new regime  before 1 July 2014.

Cost of supply and financial information

While some submissions questioned the need for seeking cost and financial information, others have welcomed the opportunity to explain their business models and the impact of cost and financial elements on their proposed pricing. In these circumstances, and given the opportunity for applicants to explain their proposed pricing in a way that is as non-prescriptive as possible while still allowing for consistency in assessment, I see this approach as having an overall benefit.  In using this information as one factor for consideration (and not as the only factor for consideration), assessment by the Pricing Commissioner is not undertaken to query substantiated costs or to set parameters in a way which interferes with the market or sets artificial parameters that do not relate to market conditions, but to understand the significance of cost and financial considerations and other business imperatives as they apply to pricing. I reiterate that any information submitted by providers will be held confidentially by the Office of the Aged Care Pricing Commissioner, and will not be shared with another person or agency.

External reference information

Where references are made to external reference information, this includes but is not limited to data on median house prices by locality and provider bond levels in geographical regions. This is not information that providers are expected to include. This information will not be used in a deterministic manner, but is one factor that the Commissioner may have regard to in making a decision.

Assessment

A copy of the Aged Care Pricing Commissioner’s Assessor Manual will be published shortly on the website at www.acpc.gov.au While the Application Guide should contain all information required for applicants to complete the Application Form, reference to the Assessor Manual will give providers further information about  how applications will be assessed.

Specific issues

The following issues raised will be reflected in the final versions of the Form and Guide.

Risk margins

The Guide contains reference to risk margins, where relevant, at s 3.2.1.  This section intends to capture all relevant factors influencing a proposed price. This could, for example, be relevant in respect of the risk in operating in a certain geographic location, or where a provider engages with any other particular risk in establishing or maintaining a facility.

Valuations

The Guide indicates that in the case of applications for prices in existing facilities, applicants should include information relating to land and/or building valuation. An exception may be made where the applicant is a not-for-profit provider who is entitled, for accounting purposes, to prepare financial statements according to the historical cost convention (cost less depreciation and impairment). In this instance, applicants should provide a statement of land and building value as reflected in financial statements. In seeking valuations, the intention has been to derive cost information that would be generally available to applicants without incurring substantial additional cost or onerous requirements, but which would still allow applicants sufficient scope to justify their proposed price. Accordingly, it has been assumed based on advice that valuations will have been obtained for normal business purposes in a significant number of cases. Where not-for-profit applicants are of the view that the historical cost convention will disadvantage them, an insured value may be provided. Alternatively, applicants may obtain a valuation. In general, it has been recognised that there  will be a degree of variance in costs of supply for existing facilities, proposed refurbished facilities and  proposed new facilities, and that particular  cost factors  may have  more  relevance in particular applications, in the same way as different capital  structures and  business models are of relevance. In particular, valuations for existing facilities may have a lesser degree of relevance in some cases. For this reason, historical bond prices and median house prices by Local Government Area are additional factors for the Commissioner to consider.

Proposed price and cost considerations

A number of submissions have queried whether particular costs can be included as part of the justification for a proposed price. In simple terms, these factors should be included where they are a relevant factor in the proposed accommodation price, and where they are not provided for by another source of revenue or, for example, are care and services provided for in the Quality of Care Principles. This may include, for example, a proportion of centralised services (such as human resources or information technology), and facilities that are relevant to the activities of residents. In a similar way, where areas such as gardens have a particular cost or are of significance in determining the proposed price, these may be included for consideration. It is reiterated that, while the Commissioner seeks cost of supply information where relevant, an assessment of the degree to which the proposed price is reflective of cost is one consideration amongst a number.

Applications for multiple room configurations

It is observed that in some cases rooms may be offered in a range of configurations in different circumstances i.e. where a room (or an interconnected set of rooms) may be offered as a double room in some circumstances, or a room for a single occupant in others. Some configurations may not require approval because the maximum accommodation payment amount will be below the threshold. However, where different possible configurations mean that an applicant wishes to seek more than one approval for a price above the threshold for the same room, depending upon the configuration, different configurations should be treated as different accommodation groups for the purpose of the application. The Guide at 1.8 has been amended to reflect this.

Total floor area

The requirement to provide the total floor area of the accommodation group has been removed from the Form.

Description of common areas

To ensure there is no duplication, the requirement to “describe” the common areas at Table A.1 (v) has been amended.

Location

The requirement to provide a description of the location of the accommodation group in the facility has been removed from Table A.1. However, applicants should include enough information for the Commissioner to identify rooms in the accommodation group.

Information and Communications Technology

The Guide will be amended to indicate that ICT facilities, whether included in the room or in accessible areas, may be included as part of a justification for a price.

Format

A number of headings have been revised to ensure there is congruency between the Form and Guide.

Attachments and word limits

Business cases or extracts from relevant documents can be attached to the form in addition to the 2000 words provided for at Table 2.1. The provision of documents such as floor plans for the relevant accommodation group, while not a requirement, will obviously enable applicants in many cases to further support their proposed price and to ensure that applications are dealt with in a timely manner. Provision of information in this manner will also remove the requirement for applicants to supply this information in the body of the Application Form. Where provided, these documents or images should be supplied at the same time as the completed Application Form (but not included in the body of the Form itself). I have very much appreciated the feedback and look forward to ongoing consultation with industry. Yours faithfully, Kim Cull Aged Care Pricing Commissioner

Lola Cochaud celebrates turning 100

Lola Cochaud celebrates turning 100 years ‘young’ at Kew Gardens Aged Care Australia Day weekend was an extra special one for Kew Gardens Aged Care this year with beloved resident, Lola Cochaud, celebrating her 100th birthday. Mrs Cochaud began celebrations by going out with family on her official birth date, 27th January, but festivities continued the following day with a visit from Local MP, Josh Frydenberg, to Kew Gardens to present Mrs Cochaud with flowers and certificates. Lola Cochaud (nee Martin) cheerily recognised the impressive milestone understatedly saying that she “has lived a very good life”. Mrs Cochaud has been a resident at Kew Gardens Aged Care for three years and maintains an active lifestyle there by participating in most activities offered by the facility. Her particular favourites include detailed embroidery and hand-sewing, bowls, cooking, tai chi and yoga. She also goes on daily walks in the beautiful surrounding Alexandra Gardens and enjoys coffees at the facility’s own Al Fresco café. Her proud family delights in Mrs Cochaud’s astounding trivia knowledge saying she remains intellectually stimulated by doing the daily crossword puzzle and is also an avid reader of non-fiction novels. Born in Melbourne as the only child of Joseph and Bertha Martin, she attended St Catherine’s School in Toorak but left in 1928 after the death of her father. By sixteen, she had begun working as a book-keeper to help contribute to the family finances. Her second career, however, began in 1964 after she completed her matriculation to simultaneously work and study over several years to become a qualified librarian. Mrs Cochaud loved her profession and worked at Northcote Library until she retired at age sixty-five. Aside from her professional achievements, Mrs Cochaud also embarked on many great adventures throughout her life. One of the greatest perhaps historically was her impressive claim to be one of the first female passengers to travel by flying boat to Darwin. Mrs Cochaud decided to take the trip to the top of Australia after her mother died in 1938, the entire voyage taking several days, as the itinerary hugged the coastline from Sydney to Darwin.  Although she had planned to continue her travelling worldwide, the war intervened and Mrs Cochaud’s adventures were prematurely thwarted. However, a new adventure began of a different kind when she married Maurie Cochaud on 18 November 1939 and brought their first son, Gordon, into the world shortly after. However, like many Darwin residents during wartime, the family had to evacuate in 1942 to safer parts. Mrs Cochaud’s sixty-three years of married life included several years living at Katamite, east of Shepparton, where Maurie had a soldier settlement block. Three more children were to follow until the family returned to Melbourne to live in Thornbury and later in Northcote until Maurie passed away in July 2003. Mrs Cochaud remained in their family home until 2006, leaving to live with her daughter for four years to finally become a permanent resident at Kew Gardens Aged Care. Looking back over the years, Mrs Cochaud says she is “more than contented” with what she’s achieved in a century. Surrounded now by her four children and their families, eleven grandchildren and thirteen great grandchildren – they all delight in helping their ‘Nanna Lola’ celebrate turning 100 years ‘young’! For more information relating to this media release, please contact Vicki Fraser – 0499 077 072 or Olivia Romet – 0419 878 167.

Streamlining the Quality Reporting Program

Dear Stakeholders Thank you for your cooperation regarding the streamlining of the Quality Reporting Program. The final stages of the process were introduced on 1 January 2014 and are outlined in this communique. The changes affect the quality reviews of all service outlets providing Australian Government subsidised aged care in the home. The streamlined approach is aimed at providing efficiencies in the quality review process, whilst maintaining a focus on the provision of quality care, particularly for those service providers that deliver both home and residential care across multiple outlets and service types. Streamlining of the Quality Reporting Program resulted in a number of changes. Initial changes to the processes included the removal of the requirement to submit a self-assessment prior to the quality review site visit, the removal of the Annual Improvement Plan and the closure of the service provider portal. An outline of the remaining changes to the quality review processes follows. Streamlined Quality Reporting Program processes
  1. Service Type reviews Quality reviews involve an assessment of the policies, systems and procedures that a service provider has in place at each of its outlets to ensure it is providing care and services in accordance with the Horne Care Standards (the Standards) across all the service types delivered. Service providers need to demonstrate that they have rigorous systems and processes in place which meet the Standards across all service types, regardless of the type of care being delivered. The quality of care should be consistent across all service types.For large service providers, Standard 1 is reviewed in detail at the first service outlet. The service provider is required to give the quality review team evidence demonstrating that each expected outcome has been met. The results from the first service outlet are then tested at subsequent outlets.Standards 2 and 3 are thoroughly reviewed at all service outlets. Assessment of the evidence provided by the service outlets focuses on confirming the delivery of quality outcomes for care recipients. This is supported by interviews with staff and care recipients and/or their families.Adopting this approach means that if the evidence is satisfactory, and systems and processes are in place at the first service outlet, it will be evidenced at any additional outlets. This allows for a risk-based approach to quality monitoring.
  2. Interim and Final Quality Review Report A number of changes have been made to the Quality Review Report (QRR) throughout the streamlining process.
    • The QRR now contains a Met or Not Met finding for each expected outcome, accompanied by a Statement of Reasons for the finding, supported by evidence. The Statement of Reasons aims to clearly establish the findings, reference material on which the findings were based and the reason for the decision.
    • An interim QRR gives service outlets an opportunity to see the preliminary findings of the quality review. It details the findings within a Statement of Reasons. On receiving the interim QRR, service providers have 14 calendar days to submit evidence, or reference existing evidence that may support the reconsideration of a Not Met finding.
    • Service providers that receive one or more Not Met findings are placed on a Timetable
    • For Improvement (TFI). The TFI provides a time frame for action, generally 12 weeks. These service providers are required to update their Plan for Continuous Improvement (PCI) with activities to be undertaken to rectify Not Met expected outcomes. The service provider has 14 calendar days to identify appropriate actions. When the actions are approved, the 12-week period starts.
  3. Outcome Score The outcome score (ie. Outcome 1, 2 or 3), which reflected the level of compliance with the Standards, has been removed from the QRR. The findings of a review now reflect the Met or Not Met outcomes supported by evidence, rather than an overall outcome score.
  4. Plan for Continuous Improvement Service providers are no longer required to submit an Annual Improvement Plan. Instead, service provides will continue to develop and maintain their PCI throughout the three-year review cycle to demonstrate compliance with the Standards. The Department may request a service provider’s PCI at any time during the review cycle.The PCI will need to be updated to include strategies and treatments to rectify any Not Met expected outcomes that may be identified in the Final QRR.
Thank you for your ongoing commitment to the Quality Reporting Program. Yours sincerely, Susanne Lander A/g Assistant Secretary Quality and Monitoring Branch Office of Aged Care Quality and Compliance January 2014

Caring for older people in warmer weather

Dear HACC Provider
 Important reminder about caring for older people in warmer weather I am writing to remind you of the impact that warmer weather may have on the older people to whom you provide care or services and the extra precautions and interventions that may be needed. It is likely that the average maximum temperatures this summer will be hotter than the long-term average maximum temperatures, over large parts of Australia.  And as you know, hotter summer weather means we need to be alert to the possibility of heatwaves. Older people are among those most at risk of heat-related illness.  Due to normal age-related changes to the body, older people do not always recognise that they are over-heated.  In addition, · older people are more likely to have a chronic medical condition and to be taking medication that may interfere with the body’s ability to regulate fluid. Older people living in the community therefore may suffer from heat stress and those who live alone without regular contact from others may be particularly at risk.  Vulnerable people are particularly at risk when there are high night-time temperatures. You will need to determine whether the level of service you provide to your clients involves you taking steps to help maintain their well-being during heatwaves.  Generally this will apply to services involving a level of direct interaction with clients (such as personal or clinical care) or client care planning and/or coordination (case management).  Where appropriate, the attached checklist may assist you to support vulnerable clients during a heat wave and to meet the requirements of the Home Care Standards, particularly Standard 2 (Identifying Care Needs). About heat-related illness The effects of heat-related illnesses can range from mild conditions such as a rash or cramps to very serious conditions such as severe confusion or heat stroke.  Heat may also worsen the condition of someone who already has a medical condition such as heart disease. A clinical assessment will be required if your client shows any signs of deterioration. A special note about medicines Some medicines increase the risk of heat-associated illness in susceptible people.  These include: •    medicines that cause dehydration or electrolyte imbalance; •    medicines likely to reduce renal function; and •    medicines that interfere with the production or regulation of heat. If you are concerned about a client’s wellbeing, his or her medical practitioner should be immediately contacted. In an emergency, contact the relevant emergency service. You may find it useful to display the attached checklist as a reminder for your staff over the coming summer months. Further information is available from state and territory health department websites. Susan Hunt, RN, PhD, FRCNA Senior Nurse Advisor Office of Aged Care Quality and Compliance 20 December 2013

Standing Council on Health

Standing council on Health communique , 8th November 13